Basket Weaving • Shop Online

Basket Weaving • Shop Online
Basket Weaving • Shop Online

Are you stuck thinking about where to get basket weaving materials? Come on in, shop online and check out our featured products! Basket weaving, also known as basketry or basket making, is the process of weaving unspun vegetable fibers into a basket or other similar form. People and artists who weave baskets are called either a basketmaker or basket weaver. Basketry is made from a variety of fibrous or pliable materials—anything that will bend and form a shape. Examples include:

pine straw,
animal hair,
hide,
grasses,
thread,
wood
rattan core (also known as reed)

The parts of a basket are the base, the side walls, and the rim. A basket may also have a lid, handle, or embellishments. Most baskets begin with a base. The base can either be woven with reed or wooden. A wooden base can come in many shapes to make a wide variety of shapes of baskets. The ‘static’ pieces of the work are laid down first. In a round basket they are referred to as ‘spokes'; in other shapes they are called ‘stakes’ or ‘staves’. Then the ‘weavers’ are used to fill in the sides of a basket.

A wide variety of basket weaving patterns can be made by changing the size, color, or by placement of a certain style of weave. Aboriginal artists achieve a multi-coloured effect they first dye the twine and then weave the twines together in the most elaborate fashion possible.

Basketry can be classified into four types:

“Coiled” basketry: using grasses and rushes
“Plaiting” basketry: using materials that are wide and ribbon-like, such as palms, yucca or New Zealand flax
“Twining” basketry: using materials from roots and tree bark. Twining actually refers to a weaving technique where two or more flexible weaving elements (“weavers”) cross each other as they weave through the stiffer radial spokes.
Wicker” and “Splint” basketry: using reed, cane, willow, oak, and ash

You can find some basket weaving materials, patterns and kits online when you visit an online basket weaving shop!

Source: wikipedia.org
Photo credit: earthheartfarm.com

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